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Views expressed by Sleep Talkin' Man rarely reflect the opinions of waking Adam.
Especially the desire to exterminate all vegetarians (but he does hate lentils.)

20100902

Sep 2 2010

"If Jesus loves me, he can join the queue with everybody else."

 or click here
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Karen's notes: "join the queue" = "get in line"

55 comments:

  1. I don't think that note was necessary but I would so love to use that phrase in christian ed class.

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  2. Thanks for the note. I didn't know what it meant:)

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  3. Is English to English translation really needed? Americans are not stupid.

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  4. LOL, and the comments are just the right side of sarky.

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  5. I definitely don't think Americans are stupid (some of my best friends are American, ha ha!), but I do know that, as this is a term that's not used at all in the States, not everyone will have been exposed to it. Also, even if someone knows that word, it is an unexpected spelling, and one might not recognize it. Let's just say I went for a better safe than sorry aproach.

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  6. this made me spit my tea out laughing!

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  7. I for one thank you for the small notes you make from time to time - especially on this one!

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  8. You'd make him queue? That's going to be a lot of hail Mary's.

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  9. As someone from Europe (do know English now living in Canada)I thank you for your lovely notes!!! I can't wait for an other one of those nights that you guys talk about what was going on, those are the best!!

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  10. Oh my! Wow! That made me laugh. But yes, STM is gonna need to change his attitude if he plans on getting into heaven. ^_^ (And yes, I knew what queue was. Is that really an English term? I've heard it so many times in the States. No harm done in putting it up though in case someone out there doesn't know!)

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  11. I really needed this laugh this morning. STM always brightens my day

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  12. I also appreciate the comments - it adds a lot to the sayings.

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  13. thanks for the translation. you brits (adam) speakin a whole bunch of strange english for us common folk. thx for britaning my day
    :)

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  14. T-shirt!!!

    Education and explanation are never wrong.

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  15. Karen- Maybe you shld title the "Karen's Note" to "British to American Translation:" before the explaination? Not everyone knows that the slangs are completely different from both sides of the pond.

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  16. LOL! Freaking awesome. Thanks for making my day. Again.

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  17. I love this! Oh and Team Thanks for the Note, here.

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  18. Omg, this one MUST be put on merchandise. I just want to use it in a conversation. I think I'm going to track down some Christians who want to save me so I can do just that.

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  19. TShirt please!!!

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  20. OMG Andrea...I love your comment! I just love starting my day with STM and all the wonderful commentary that goes along with it!

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  21. For those who are against the note - not only English and Americans read this blog. Maybe there are people who need the explanation.

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  22. stm is as cynic and wonderful as usual!))
    thanks for brightening my sick evening =)

    btw. writing to you from russia. must say you are really popular down here) plus probably many of your russian fans know only one translation? so thanks for the note =) you're doing a wonderful job!

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  23. russia? seriously, wow. i never had thought it would have translated. this is awesome! thanks de-cube.

    massive thanks to everyone as usual for your fabulous comments.

    adam

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  24. LMAO if people ever try to convert me, this is what I'll say to them... :'DD

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  25. I like the translations even though I know what he means most of the time... haha

    And I really think this needs to be a bookmark that people can put in their bibles :-) haha

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  26. As an American, in America, I can say we use that phrase all the time, but most Americans these days would probably write "cue" or "que" because no one learns to spell anymore lol

    Not that I mind the note, I'm sure a lot of people needed it.

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  27. STM, Uh... Jesus loves you, just not in that way! Oh! And if you have a line waiting? Perhaps you should reconsider some of your lifestyle choices!

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  28. I don't know whether to laugh or start praying for you lmao! j/k, I know it is in fun and not real (hail Mary, full of grace, the world...) lol.

    Anyhoo, leave poor Karen alone! not everyone speaks English whether North American or "over the pond" so there :-P; besides, I personally feel jipped (sp?) if there isn't a "Karen's note", it's like there's something missing from the post :-(

    Cheers :-)

    Kimmie B.

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  29. Pretty please make this a T-Shirt. I would love to wear it :)

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  30. felt like adding another comment.
    for you americans out there who understand both phrases - good for you, blah blah.
    but it's a bit selfish to think that if you understand, then everyone does.

    maybe you should think about other people.
    (didnt want to hurt anyone's feeling, sorry if i did? but i think you're hurting karen's feeling, because she's very thoughtful to do those things)))

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  31. my my. it's a shame you can't edit.
    sorry for the grammar. must be my 38,8 body temperature ^_^

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  32. This must be put on a shirt! I'd wear it! Also, about the "translation": I'd prefer a translation that I don't need over no comment/no translation. Also, judging from the comments some people needed the translation.

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  33. "Is English to English translation really needed? Americans are not stupid."

    The problem arises when we (on either side of the pond) think we don't need translation but actually we do...the Queen's English and Americanize are not the same languages.

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  34. I always miss Karen's notes when there aren't any either! I like my daily input of both Karen and Adam.

    Side note: I believe it's gypped, and my spell-check is confirming it. Stems from Gypsy :)

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  35. I'm from Argentina, and your blog always gets me a smile!
    I love how smart and many times even classy Adam's insults are (it's not just swearing!) and how utterly brillian and funny he is when showing how much he loves himself (not just he, we all, included Jesus I believe, love STM)
    Besides, I've reading the blog for several months now and I must say, you seem to be such a lovely couple! I wish you all the luck in the world...
    thanks you for making my day ;)

    pd: I`m sorry if my english is to bad, I still haven`t sit for the FCE yet, so...

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  36. to bad=too bad
    i know it is obvious what I meant to write, but anyway...

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  37. As an American, I know what a queue is, and have used the word in context, but I did have to look up the "alternate spelling." I never would have thought to spell it cue, which to me is a different word entirely. I also remember learning the word queue, and that it was a British word, and finding pleasure in learning it, and so appreciated the memory the explanation of the word gave me rather than resented it.

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  38. I bet anonymous 1 and anonymous 3 are the same self-righteous person lol

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  39. I didn't know what they were singing in "Magic Bus" until the first time I printed something over a network.

    It would make a great T-Shirt, but I'd be afraid to wear it! :)

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  40. de-cube said btw. writing to you from russia.

    Hello neighbor, I'm reading from Finland.

    While I am familiar with both American (grew up there) and British English, there are still words that stump me from both. For example, a BBC news article recently used the word "holdall", and I had to go look it up because I had never heard it before. Don't even get me started on regional American slang.

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  41. Camila,

    Don't sweat it! English, particularly American English is the most difficult language to learn!

    Here's some examples:

    "PARE a PEAR with a PAIR of scissors!".

    "Bill went TO the store with TWO friends. His sister went TOO!"

    Add to this words that are spelled the same, yet pronounced differently, and the maddening slang in which what one says is the exact opposite of what one means, and you have a right nightmare!

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  42. i'm not sure what you mean by regional american slang, jackie, maybe i just havent stumbled across it.
    or maybe i couldnt tell the difference between NY-english and Vegas-english at the age of nine))

    imho, cockney is damn hard to understand. sometimes i can't even divide the speech into words)

    btw. hello, finnish neighbour))

    stoney, lol. maybe you should some chinese (or even russian) to understand, that english is a very simple language.
    the presence of homophones is not a unique characteristic of the english language. i wouldnt call it very hard to understand either.

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  43. I'm another grumpy American who read Karen's note and thought, "I know what it means, thank you very much." Really, I watch TV and read books from the UK all the time, and never have needed a translation. I think we Americans are a bit sensitive about how we are perceived by Brits... even when that Brit is actually American. ;)

    Camila: It's always the people who speak English the best who then apologize for their poor English. You're doing just fine, girl! Much better than my Spanish, that's for sure.

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  44. I want to get that shirt for my favourite priest!

    You and your husband have continued to make me smile with all his quips. And thank you for taking the time to post!

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  45. de-cube: In different parts of America, people use different words and phrases to mean the same thing. For example, when I lived in Texas, a woman there asked me where we "stay at", apparently meaning "where do you live?".

    There's also the regional variation in the word people use to mean a fizzy drink: in some parts of the country, it's soda. In other parts of the country, it's pop. Then there are some places where people call all fizzy drinks Coke, regardless of whether they are Coke (or even cola).

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  46. as far as i know, "stay at" is used to find out the living lotation of a temporal visitor, where as "live" - is a noun refering to your home and everyday life place.
    but maybe i'm wrong..

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  47. "The world's just not as sparkly as you want it to be. We should all carry some glitter and add a little bit along the way."


    I love this one

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  48. Once at a Harry Potter party at my work (bookstore) I told a lady there was queue to the bathroom (I guess I was caught up in the HP world). She looked at me extremely confused and said "HUH?" So I suppose the translation is needed.

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  49. I like the 'translations'. I'm not English speaking as my first language and seeing what is british terms and what is american terms is very helpful. I tend to just mix it up though I've started to figure out what goes where in later years. ;) Like 'ou' in british and 'er' in american.

    So please don't stop doing that, Karen. :)

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  50. Please, oh, please, oh please...as someone who grew up in the Bible belt and ran as far away as possible and still be in the US, please, oh, please, oh, pleeeeeeeease put "If Jesus loves me..." on plus size shirts! (Red, 3x if I'm choosing,)

    Oh! And V necks would be AWESOME!

    Thanks!

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  51. Nice XD I might have to use that one.

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